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Focus on Regulation

Tag Archives: Infrastructure

Queen’s Speech 2014

In the annual Queen’s Speech before Parliament this morning, the Queen set out the legislative agenda for Coalition’s final year.  Four of those measures, which concern infrastructure, deregulation for businesses, the possibility of recalling MPs for misconduct and devolution, are interesting from a constitutional and administrative law perspective. Infrastructure Bill The Infrastructure Bill, regarded by

Obama Administration Announces Comprehensive Reforms for Permitting Large Infrastructure Projects

On 14 May 2014, the Obama administration released a plan for improving the federal government’s review and permitting of large infrastructure projects (including surface and air transportation, renewable and conventional energy infrastructure, electricity transmission, water resource projects, ports and waterways, and broadband infrastructure). Read More: Obama Administration Announces Comprehensive Reforms for Permitting Large Infrastructure Projects

Quadrennial energy review will shape domestic energy future

President Obama this month initiated an annual “Quadrennial Energy Review,” directing his Administration to create a four-year, cross-agency plan for the nation’s energy transportation, transmission, and delivery infrastructure. The QER, developed with input from a broad range of federal agencies, will set federal energy infrastructure priorities well beyond the Obama presidency.

Court of Appeals Affirms FCC’s Pole Attachment Decision

Yesterday, a three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit unanimously upheld the key prongs of the FCC’s dramatic shift in its interpretation of the Federal Pole Attachment Act.  The Commission’s new interpretations for the first time gave ILECs access to the FCC to resolve their disputes with electric

Superstorm Sandy Foreshadows a New Paradigm for Protecting Critical Communications and Electric Infrastructure

On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy sent a fourteen-foot storm surge through New York City. Winds ravaged aerial infrastructure and water cascaded through subway tunnels and utility conduit systems, leading to a series of power station failures that left Wall Street and the rest of Manhattan below 34th Street without electrical power and with only